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3 Steps to Writing Listings That Sell

The way we advertise vacant apartments has changed a lot over the years. From newspapers to apps, the industry has shifted away from many traditional platforms and spread over a million niche websites and tech tools. One thing that hasn't changed about rental listings, however, is the way we word them. Behind every slick app lies a paragraph or two detailing why a person might want to move in and the costs associated with living in a given unit. Scott Safadi of Cal Bay Property Management recommends these ways to ensure you and your team are writing effective listings:

 

Pen a Catchy Headline

 

Just as headlines on websites like Buzzfeed capture our attention, your headline for your listing should be intriguing and compelling. Simply listing out facts about your rental isn't enough to convince folks that your link is worth clicking. Instead, create a headline that showcases the personality of the place. While exciting adjectives might be easiest to rely on, resist the urge to make your headline too complicated. Simple descriptions are best!

 

Play to Your Strengths

 

Emphasizing your product's best features is a classic way to sell just about anything. This is especially true when encouraging folks to move into your vacant unit. You're not just selling a product, you're selling a lifestyle. With that in mind, play up the positives while downplaying any negatives. Small apartments are cozy, old units are charming, and spots that aren't exactly central can be described as quiet. While it's never a good idea to misconstrue an apartment's downsides, it's often a matter of perspective.

 

Create Trust

 

A good tenant will be looking for a good landlord, not just a good apartment. With that in mind, begin on a great first step with an informational component that builds trust. Write a thorough paragraph that describes what your place has to offer tenants. Include important details about the kitchen, bathroom and laundry room. Avoid abbreviations that might confuse folks outside of the industry, and always make sure to proofread before publishing.

 

- Scott Safadi, Cal Bay Property Management

The way we advertise vacant apartments has changed a lot over the years. From newspapers to apps, the industry has shifted away from many traditional platforms and spread over a million niche websites and tech tools. One thing that hasn't changed about rental listings, however, is the way we word them. Behind every slick app lies a paragraph or two detailing why a person might want to move in and the costs associated with living in a given unit. Scott Safadi of Cal Bay Property Management recommends these ways to ensure you and your team are writing effective listings:

Pen a Catchy Headline

Just as headlines on websites like Buzzfeed capture our attention, your headline for your listing should be intriguing and compelling. Simply listing out facts about your rental isn't enough to convince folks that your link is worth clicking. Instead, create a headline that showcases the personality of the place. While exciting adjectives might be easiest to rely on, resist the urge to make your headline too complicated. Simple descriptions are best!

Play to Your Strengths

Emphasizing your product's best features is a classic way to sell just about anything. This is especially true when encouraging folks to move into your vacant unit. You're not just selling a product, you're selling a lifestyle. With that in mind, play up the positives while downplaying any negatives. Small apartments are cozy, old units are charming, and spots that aren't exactly central can be described as quiet. While it's never a good idea to misconstrue an apartment's downsides, it's often a matter of perspective.

Create Trust

A good tenant will be looking for a good landlord, not just a good apartment. With that in mind, begin on a great first step with an informational component that builds trust. Write a thorough paragraph that describes what your place has to offer tenants. Include important details about the kitchen, bathroom and laundry room. Avoid abbreviations that might confuse folks outside of the industry, and always make sure to proofread before publishing.

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